Quick Guide to eBook Publishing with Amazon KDP – Part 3

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If you’re publishing your first eBook with Amazon KDP, this five part series is designed to give you a few hints and tips, as well as some links to other sources of help. If you missed Part 1, you can find it here, and Part 2 is here.

Part 3: Creating an eBook Cover

They say you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover but of course we all do – and much of that judgement is unconscious. The human brain is wired to be able to interpret images much faster than it can text, so your cover design is really important.

First, have a think about the genre your eBook will fall into, and spend some time researching the kinds of designs used in that particular genre. It’s obvious that the types of cover used in romance novels will differ from those used in, say, Sci Fi or crime thrillers. Note the use of colour, and the kinds of images and font styles which tend to be popular. If you’re writing non-fiction, again, have a look at the way modern non-fiction is presented. For instance, in your particular subject area, is it usual to have a stylish minimalist cover image or an engaging photo montage?

If you’re confident in your design skills, and reasonably tech savvy, there are a number of ways you can produce your own cover. Amazon has its own cover creator, but I’ve not used it so can’t vouch for its quality or ease of use. You can also try Canva which allows to you create a cover for free, if you use one of their standard templates and images.

Remember that any images you use in your cover design must be copyright-free. Alternately, or you will need to provide your own original images, or pay for any copyrighted images that you use.

Notwithstanding all of the above, unless you are a design genius, it’s probably advisable to get assistance with this part of your eBook’s production. There are lots of websites out there to help with this. You might want to try 99designs, or you can join a site such as http://www.fiverr.com where you can find designers who will provide services from as little as $5, as the name suggests (though I’d expect to pay £20-£30 depending on the number of images you need to purchase, and how much manipulation the designer needs to do). I’ve used the same designer at Fiverr for all my eBook covers – you can find her here.

When preparing your design brief, try to be as specific about your ideas as possible at the outset – a vague description will increase the likelihood of getting something you didn’t want! Remember though that the designer will have more experience in what works and what doesn’t, so be prepared to take on board their suggestions and consider any alternatives they might present.

One of the most important things you have to consider when designing a cover for an eBook is that the image has to look good both as a thumbnail picture and a full size cover. These are the three covers for my short story-related eBooks, two fiction and one non-fiction:

Screenshot 2018-03-24 14.46.03

If you’re hoping that your eBook is the first of many, and intend to create more in the future, you ought to think about branding too. It’s for this reason that I’ve tried to keep to a certain style and colour palette with my books. These aim to mirror this blog, so you’ll see a lot of similar colours and patterns used in both.

OK, so that’s all for now on cover creation. See you next week for the next step in Part 4!

 

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2 responses »

  1. Pingback: Quick Guide to eBook Publishing with Amazon KDP – Part 4 | Jenny Roman

  2. Pingback: Quick Guide to eBook Publishing with Amazon KDP – Part 5 | Jenny Roman

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