Quick Guide to eBook Publishing with Amazon KDP – Part 5

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This is the last in a series of five posts designed to help you if you’re publishing your first eBook with Amazon KDP. It aims to give you a few hints and tips as well as some links to other sources of help. If you’ve just stumbled upon this post today, you can catch up with all the previous parts using these links:

Now we’re at the final stage:

Part 5: Marketing your eBook

Actually, it’s a bit misleading to say this is the final part, as the promotion and marketing process should really be on your mind from the moment you have the idea for the book. But I’ve left it until last in this series as, if this is your first eBook, getting the darn thing written and formatted is daunting enough.

One of the hardest things about self-publishing is the fact that you have to learn to wear a lot of different hats. Yes, you’re a writer, but you’re also a copyeditor, proofreader and cover designer. You’ve had to learn how to deal with the technical aspects of eBook creation. Now you also have to become the Marketing Department for your writing business. If you’ve been able to develop some or all of these skills in other roles prior to embarking on your writing career, then you’ll have a head start. For most of us though, not all the skills in the self-publishers toolkit will come naturally. If you’re a creative writer and a dreamer, if you like to spend vast amounts of time in your own head with just your characters for company, chances are you’re not going to be the sort of person who enjoys public speaking or self-promotion. So yes, marketing your book can be hard – but you’re a creative person (you must be, else you wouldn’t have written a book in the first place) so you should be able to come up with a strategy which suits both your book and your personality.

Fortunately there are loads of great resources out there for self-published authors. For instance, you can try Mark Dawsons’s Self Publishing Formula  or Joanna Penn’s site The Creative Penn. Both contain free resources as well as their own books and courses, and links to other useful sites. There are also loads of great articles in print magazines such as Writers’ Forum and Writing.

Read as much as you can about marketing and promotional strategies for eBooks, but don’t get carried away – keep in mind all the time what you are trying to achieve. Your eBook is available – what you want to do is let people who might be interested know how they can find it. There are lots of ways to go about this, including:

  • Social media: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc. are great ways to reach a fairly wide range of people relatively quickly and easily. But there is so much promotional activity on the internet that you have to have an integrated approach to publicizing yourself and your book. Ramming it down people’s throats by repeated posting “BUY MY BOOK!” is not the way to go. Yes, you need to run a few ads, but more importantly, you need to get involved in discussions, and engage with people about topics relevant to your book. Make online friends. Treat social media in the same way you would any other social interaction. You’re aiming to raise awareness and generate interest in your writing – you do this by building an online presence, and developing relationships.
  • Telling all your friends! It can seem incredibly embarrassing to talk about your writing with people you know (the non-writing people that is!). It’s difficult to work into conversation, and we Brits find it particularly tricky to talk about our own achievements. I always think of the bit in Blackadder Goes Forth when George says “Well you know, one doesn’t want to blow one’s own trumpet,” and Blackadder says, “You might at least have told us you had a trumpet!” That seems so true when people you know well say things like, “Oh, I didn’t know you write!” And you’re then embarrassed that you didn’t say something before. You’ll also be amazed when the people you least expected to be interested in your writing are the ones who end up being your biggest fans! Incidentally, you’ll probably know lots of people who don’t have a Kindle, but you can tell them how to download the app for their phone or laptop so they can be part of the eBook experience.
  • Sending press-releases to local newspapers (I’ve sent out a couple of press releases, and they were used – local papers are desperate for copy!). Though I’m not wholly convinced that this does generate any additional sales, it can lead to other opportunities, and does raise your profile as a writer.
  • Blogging about your writing (or chosen specialised subject if you write non-fiction). Or getting other people to blog about it! Or commenting on other people’s blogs… Or going on a blog tour…
  • Giving talks to writing groups or other interested parties. Or taking part in an event at a local library, bookshop, or other local community activity.
  • Paid advertising on Facebook/Amazon etc.
  • Building a mailing list.

Whatever you decide to do, remember to keep it up. Maintain that social media presence. Attend those events. Keep talking to your readers.

So, that’s my quick guide in a nutshell. To sum up, it is possible, if you do your own cover design using your own images, to create an eBook with absolutely no outlay, but if you want professional help, be prepared to spend money on cover creation, editing and proofreading, and marketing and promotion. Be realistic about how much you can afford to spend given your likely earnings – eBooks are not a get-rich-quick scheme.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this series, and picked up a few tips on the way. If you’re about to have a go at creating your first eBook, I’d love to hear how you get on.

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6 responses »

  1. Thanks, Jenny.

    I find the marketing and promotion side the hardest. I worry that I bore people going on about my books all the time, but then as you say I have people expressing surprise that I write, or that I’ve written as much as I have, so clearly I’m not spreading the message very effectively.

    • It’s so hard to get the balance right, isn’t it? Self-promotion feels like showing off or self-aggrandisement. I’m usually so worried about this that I don’t do enough basic promotion!

  2. I agree with both of you, Patsy & Jenny. How much marketing is too much? Or are we too shy & retiring? Be nice to employ a publicist to do it our behalf, then it wouldn’t feel like shouting all the time.

    • Definitely too shy & retiring – but also don’t want to be big & brash, so it’s a fine line! Yes, agree about the publicist, Sally – though if I could afford to hire one, wouldn’t it mean I was doing so well I didn’t really need one?! 😄

  3. Thanks for this series of beginners’ guides. I still haven’t confidence in my story to publish it (a few more edits i think…) but I’m keeping your articles in hand for when I do. That step seems daunting enough, without the thought of promoting it… But I’ve decided there’s no point going through all that confidence-angst without giving my brainchild a fighting chance.

    • I don’t think you ever feel quite ready, Cathy. But if you love the story you’ve told, chances are readers will too. And after you’ve put in all that effort, you owe it to yourself. Hope this series helps you on your way – good luck with the story. X

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