Tag Archives: ebook

Quick Guide to eBook Publishing with Amazon KDP – Part 4

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If you’re publishing your first eBook with Amazon KDP, this five part series is designed to give you a few hints and tips, as well as some links to other sources of help. If you missed Part 1, you can find it here, Part 2 is here, and Part 3 is here.

Part 4: Uploading your eBook to Amazon KDP

OK, so you now have your perfected manuscript correctly formatted, and your super front cover which looks good not only in full size, but also as a thumbnail. Now comes the exciting part – uploading it all to KDP.

First, you need to go to https://kdp.amazon.com/ (There’s a cute little video on this page which tells you all about publishing via KDP.) If you already have an Amazon account, you should be able to create a KDP account and sign in with your usual details. This then takes you to a page with tabs for “Bookshelf”, “Reports”, “Community” and “KDP Select”.

The “Bookshelf” is where you create your new eBook, and where the information for this book is then stored. In the future, as you write and upload more books, you’ll add to your Bookshelf.

Before you go any further, I recommend you buy a copy of Sally Jenkins’ eBook Kindle Direct Publishing for Absolute Beginners – it’s £1.99 and will take you through the process step by step. I found it incredibly helpful for my first eBook. Without Sally’s straightforward explanations, I would probably have wasted hours trying to work it all out for myself, particularly the financial aspects which you need to complete in detail for the first upload. (This includes your author/publisher information, and payment, banking and tax details so that Amazon can pay you any royalty monies owing – these are paid two months in arrears.) Subsequent eBooks are always more straightforward since you don’t have to complete all this information afresh each time.

Briefly then, in your “Bookshelf” you click to create a new eBook title. You then need to fill in all the details for the book, including the language it’s written in, the title, author etc. Next you’ll be asked to provide the book’s description – the blurb which will appear on the book’s Amazon page. This is really important and you need to take time to create something which will engage a potential reader’s attention, and make them want to click and download your book. This is surprisingly tricky, and it’s probably best to draft it offline and cut and paste it into the description box.

Next come the keywords and categories. These are also extremely important to enable potential readers to search for and find your book from the kazillions which are now available. You can have up to seven key words or phrases – and it’s important to spend time thinking about these. Put yourself in the mind of a potential reader. Imagine how you would search for a book. Think about what you would type into the search bar. Try searching for other similar books to yours.

You’ll be asked to select two categories in which you wish your eBook to be displayed. Think of these as akin to the areas or shelves in a physical bookshop where your book should be found. Try to be as specific as Amazon’s sub-sections will allow. (This is easier if your book falls into a clearly defined genre.)

Next you need to upload the manuscript file and the cover. When you upload the text, the upload process will check for spelling errors and inform you if it thinks there’s something wrong – you can then check and either amend or choose to ignore the issues raised. (I assume fantasy books always generate lots of “errors” as they are more likely to contain names or words which Amazon’s text checker will not recognise.)

At this stage you can use the previewer to check how your eBook will appear in an e-reader. It’s amazing how the odd formatting problem may still appear. If this happens, go back and amend your manuscript file, and upload again.

One of the important things you have to decide is whether or not you tick to join “KDP Select”. The plus side of Select is that anyone who is a member of Kindle Unlimited can download and read your eBook for free, and you’ll receive a (tiny) income per page read, and (arguably of more benefit) you may gain more reviews from this wider readership. The downside to Select is that it demands you publish exclusively with Amazon. This means you cannot market your book through Kobo or any other platform. If you tick to join Select, this is for a 90 day period. Once the 90 days is up, you can review the situation and decide if you’d like to continue.

Whether you decide to stick with Select or not, you need to choose your royalty plan and set up your pricing strategy. You will be asked to choose your primary marketplace (for me, this is Amazon.co.uk), set the price for this marketplace and then Amazon will automatically generate the prices for the other territories.

Now comes the exciting moment when you hit the button: Publish Your Kindle eBook. Whoop! Amazon says it can take up to 72 hours for your book to go live, but usually it’s much quicker than this. You will receive an email when the process is complete.

So there you go – now you’re a published author! But don’t go thinking your work is done. Read the final part of this series next week to find out what you should be doing post-publication.

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Attracting the Reader’s Attention: Choosing the best eBook Cover Design

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For us British, anything related to self-promotion tends not to come naturally. We’re brought up in a culture where mentioning your achievements is only a step away from boasting – and we don’t approve of boasting, ho no! If you’re a writer, the chances are you’re at the quiet and shy end of the social spectrum, possibly a little insular, with perhaps a tendency towards self-doubt too. I’d put myself firmly in this category.

This means I’m mostly doing the social media equivalent of standing at the back of a busy room, raising my hand and giving a polite cough to get everyone’s attention. Sometimes no-one notices. Sometimes I don’t even have the courage to do it at all. Everyone carries on talking, and I just stand there thinking I probably should mention what I’m doing, but maybe it’s not the best time.

But now I really ought to tell you formally about my latest project. I’m writing a book. Just a little one you understand (so that you know I’m not boasting!). It’s my first non-fiction book: “Short Story Competitions: A Writer’s Guide”. I’ve aimed to incorporate all that I’ve learned from my own experiences as both entrant and judge – the idea being the reader will be able to learn from my mistakes rather than having to make so many of their own!

Alongside drafting the text for the book, I pondered the cover design for a long time. There’s no way I’d attempt to create my own eBook cover, but I sent a couple of ideas to Shar, my cover designer, and she mocked up three designs for me.

 

As I’m pretty rubbish at making decisions, I decided to consult family and friends, Facebook and the Twittersphere. The results were really interesting – each cover got lots of support, and there were also some good comments, discussions of the relative merits of each, and suggestions for improvements. Of course, with an eBook cover, you have to think about how the design will work both large scale and in thumb nail form when the reader is quickly scanning through the available options.

If you’ve not chosen a favourite yet, or you’d like to make a further suggestion about one or more of the designs, I’ve love to hear your comments. If you’d like to see the final cover design before the book is out, please click the link on the right hand side of the blog to join my new mailing list. (Oh, did I mention…. *whispers* I’ve got a new mailing list!) 😉

Special Offer for Storytelling Week

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Who doesn’t love hearing a story told to them? Whether you’re a child listening with rapt attention to a bedtime story made up for you by your parents, or you’re an adult listening to an audio book in the car on the daily commute, there’s something magical about being told a story. As someone who reads quite quickly, and not always very carefully (in fact, sometimes I skim read – a terrible admission for a writer!), listening to a story sometimes helps me pick up nuances and details I’d otherwise have missed.

Well, this great oral tradition is celebrated during National Storytelling Week which this year runs from 28th January to 4th February. You can find out all about it here:

http://www.sfs.org.uk/national-storytelling-week

I’m afraid I don’t yet have any audio versions of my stories, though there are lots of other out there, such as Patsy Collins’ story “Uncle Mick” available to listen to here:

Not to be outdone though, in honour of all things short-story related, my collection The Camel in the Garden is free to download from Amazon Kindle this weekend.

If you take the opportunity to download it, you could always read it to someone else! And if you like the stories, and had time to leave a brief Amazon review, I’d be ever so grateful.

Thank you – and happy reading!

 

Free and half-price stories for National Short Story Week

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This year, National Short Story Week runs from 14th to 20th November celebrating all things short story-related. The aim is to raise awareness of short stories themselves and those who write and publish them.

As someone who loves the medium of the short story, as both a reader and writer, I’m looking forward to seeing what the week brings. Patron Katie Fforde says, “Let’s get everyone reading, writing and listening to short stories in this designated week.” My tiny contribution to this aim is two special offers I’m running on my own short story collections.

The Camel in the Garden, a collection of three short about loss, love and family, is free from 14th to 18th November. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Camel-Garden-Three-stories-family-ebook/dp/B01EPBTO92/ref=pd_sim_351_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=5A7PRP33X1R38X5PQXR9

Beyond Words, 12 short stories about love, death, and deception, is half-price from 14th to 20th November.  https://www.amazon.co.uk/Beyond-Words-short-stories-deception-ebook/dp/B01JWLPKW0/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

If you don’t usually read short stories, this week is a great opportunity to try some. If you’re interested in writing short stories, and perhaps having a go at entering a few competitions, you may find Beyond Words useful to read, as each of the stories has either been short-listed, long-listed, placed or highly commended in a variety of competitions.

I hope as many people as possible take this opportunity to get involved with short fiction – reading it, writing it, and reviewing it. And if you pick up, or download, a short story this week, I hope you love it and want to talk about it.

For more information on National Short Story Week, visit the website:  http://www.nationalshortstoryweek.org.uk/