Tag Archives: Flash Fiction

3 Writing Competitions for Your Diary

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For those of you who might benefit from a writing goal to help with motivation, or new writers who are thinking about sending some work out into the big wide world, here are three writing competitions which might appeal:

  • The Fiction Desk – Newcomer Prize 2017 for short stories (1,000 – 7,000 words) – deadline 31st May, £500 to the winner (entry fee £8)

http://www.thefictiondesk.com/submissions/newcomer-short-story-prize.php

  • Reflex Fiction: flash fiction (180-360 words) – deadline 31st May, £1,000 to the winner (entry fee £7)

http://www.reflexfiction.com/flash-fiction-submissions-entry-form/

  • Hysteria Writing Competition – deadline 31st August – 3 categories:
    • Poetry – max 20 lines, £75 to the winner (entry fee £3)
    • Short Story – max 2,000 words, £150 to the winner (entry fee £5)
    • Flash fiction – max 250 words, £75 to the winner (entry fee £3)

https://www.hysteriauk.co.uk/

And if you’re thinking of entering any of these, and are looking for some tips, I’ve blogged about my experience previously here:

https://jennyroman.wordpress.com/2016/09/10/short-story-competitions-5-tips-for-success/

Best of luck!

 

Reflex Fiction – Flash Fiction Contest

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If flash fiction is your thing, and you fancy having a go at a competition with some decent prize money, you could do much worse than trying Reflex Fiction.

Reflex Fiction is a quarterly on-line competition for stories between 180 and 360 words.  The closing date for the current contest is 31st May, and there’s £1,000 up for grabs for the winner (though the entry fee is fairly steep for a flash comp at £7). You can find the details here:

http://www.reflexfiction.com/flash-fiction-contest-schedule/

While the prize money might be one of the attractions, another great thing about the contest is that, after they have announced the long list for the current competition, they publish one story a day on the site working their way towards the final winner. So even if your story doesn’t make the final cut, there’s a chance it will be selected as one of the “almost made it” judges favourites.

Currently, the site is publishing stories from the Spring contest (which, incidentally was free to enter, though with a correspondingly smaller prize pot), and my piece Battered is today’s published story – you can read it here:

http://www.reflexfiction.com/battered-by-jenny-roman/

 

 

The Judging Panel – Hysteria 2017

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Regular readers of this blog will know I love short story competitions. The demands of sticking to a specific theme or word count, the inclusion of a special word or phrase, or even just having the focus of a deadline can all help with motivation. In fact, sometimes the more restrictions that seem to be imposed, the harder your story-telling brain seems to work to come up with a idea which will fit the bill.

I’ve tried my hand at entering lots of short story competitions in recent years – sometimes I’ve been successful, sometimes less so. But I’ve usually found that the discipline involved in editing a story to suit the demands of a specific competition has helped me to improve on the original idea or draft.

It seemed an obvious next step to try my hand at judging. I’ve previously assisted with short-listing for a competition, which I thoroughly enjoyed, and so when the opportunity came to become part of the short story panel on the Hysteria UK 2017 writing competition, I jumped at the chance. Being one of a panel of five seems less daunting for a first timer too!

Of course, short story judging is subjective, so even though we have a clear set of criteria to use while we’re judging, I’m sure there will be pieces which impress me but do nothing for another member of the panel, and vice versa. Overall though, I’m confident we’ll be able to make a good decision. And during this process, we’ll have had the opportunity to read a huge variety of stories – from which I’m sure we’ll learn a great deal.

If you’re a female writer, writing in the flash fiction, poetry or short story genres, you have until 31st August 2017 to submit your piece – head over to the website for details:

https://www.hysteriauk.co.uk/

If you’ve never entered a writing competition before, why not have a go at this one which supports the work of the Hysterectomy Association, helping women worldwide. There are cash prizes, and winners and runners-up will be published in the annual anthology.

And if you aren’t successful, it doesn’t necessarily mean your story wasn’t well-written or enjoyed by the judges. There’s still a story which sticks in my mind from my short-listing experience – the story in question didn’t make the final selection and, as it was judged anonymously, I have no idea who the author was, but years later I can still remember the quirky writing which I enjoyed tremendously. So keep writing, keep sending out your work, because there is an audience out there who will appreciate it.

If you’re interested in entering the competition, and want to find out more about the judges, they will each be interviewed in the coming weeks. You can read my interview on the Hysteria website here:

https://www.hysteriauk.co.uk/2017/04/17/meet-jenny-roman-hysteria-2017-short-story-category-judge/

#Hysteria2017 Now Open for Entries

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The Hysteria Writing Competition 2017 is now open for entries.

If you’re a female writer in any of the following genres:

  • short stories (up to 2,000 words)
  • flash fiction (up to 250 words)
  • poetry (up to 20 lines)

then this could be the competition for you.

The competition is run annually by the Hysterectomy Association, which provides information and support to women all over the world. They are looking for entries which appeal to their website visitors who are mostly women between 25-65. Stories should not be about hysterectomy itself, but can be in any genre except erotica or horror.

Entry fees are £3 per flash fiction or poem, and £5 per short story.

An anthology of winners and runners-up is published each year, so if you’re interested in entering, you can see what has been successful in the past.

For more information, visit the website: https://www.hysteriauk.co.uk/

Flash Fiction – One in a Million!

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If you’re a writer of short stories or flash fiction, you may be interested in the “One Million Stories Creative Writing Project” at:

http://www.millionstories.net/index.html

As their homepage states, “It is our mission to discover, select and showcase some of the very best new short fiction being written today, and then publish it right here for you to enjoy…”

They have a specific page dedicated to flash fiction, called The Sharp End and they have just published my 100 word piece, “Sunburn”:

http://www.millionstories.net/TheSharpEnd.html

The One Million Stories Project is open for submissions now. They are looking for anything between 50-5,000 words.  Check out their guidelines here:

http://www.millionstories.net/contactus.html

And of course, if you like my flash piece, you might want to read my short story collection Beyond Words available here:

 

 

Popshot Magazine -Submissions Open

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I was lucky enough to receive a subscription to Popshot magazine for Christmas, and I’ve been really impressed so far.  Popshot is devoted to literary fiction and poetry, but if you’ve seen an issue, you’ll know it’s beautifully designed and illustrated so there are also submission opportunities if you are a budding artist.

There have been 15 issues released so far (subscribers get three issues a year – I’ve had “The Curious Issue” and “The Adventure Issue”) and submissions are now open for their 16th issue, on the theme of “hope”. For more info, click here. You have until 24th July to submit.

    

If you’re interested in submitting, you can also get an online edition (including a free preview) but I have to say, the print magazine is so gorgeous (and reasonably priced – £6 for an individual issue, £10 for a year’s subscription) that I still think a real, tangible copy is the best!

 

Jenny Roman is 100!

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WordPress tells me that this is my 100th post on this blog. In celebration of this mini milestone, I’ve decided to include a daft piece of flash fiction I wrote some time ago as part of an exercise for one of my writers’ groups.

I love flash fiction – love the challenge of trying to cram as much as possible into so few words. I always think it’s paradoxically easier to write when there are lots of restrictions – either word count, or topic, or perhaps key words to be included, or maybe the style. Somehow having to be creative within boundaries works for me. I come unstuck when it’s free choice. My mind just goes blank.

I’ve had a go at a few 100 word pieces – some quite dark – but this one is just a bit of nonsense. For fun. 😉

 

Alien

I’m looking for my football when I find him. He says, ‘Take me to your leader.’

I imagine us catching the train to London, where even his green skin and three-pronged antennae will attract almost no attention. I picture us walking to Downing Street, the conversation I’ll have with the police guard. David Cameron coming out to greet us on the steps of No 10; Nick Cleg behind him and just a little to the left. The cameras flashing.

I wrinkle my nose. ‘How about I just take you to meet my mum?’

The alien seems happy with that.

 

 

Short Fiction, Motivation, and the Teapot in the Fridge

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The writing website http://www.readwave.com has launched a new initiative – writing “themes”. There are 48 themes in total, ranging from familiar genre categories (e.g. Crime Fiction, Sci Fi & Fantasy, Literary Fiction) to the more unusual (People Watching, Change the World, and the intriguingly titled Ludicrous Lists!). Stories of up to 800 words can be uploaded to any one of these themes, and will appear on the website. OK, there’s no money in it, but there is opportunity for feedback, which is the next best thing, don’t you think?

Having decided to upload a short piece under the theme of “Loss”, I was contacted by Rob at the site who asked if I could supply a photo illustration for the story. Since my piece features the narrator catching herself putting the teapot in the fridge, clearly a photo of a teapot in a fridge would be appropriate. Of course, on closer inspection, my fridge was not in a fit state for a photo shoot – hence a hurried clean up. (Funny how motivation can come from the most unusual sources!) If you want to see the finished result (or indeed, read the short piece), you can find it here: http://www.readwave.com/forgetting_s19432

If you prefer to submit a piece of short fiction with the chance of a prize, The Fiction Desk are running a flash fiction competition for stories between 250 and 1000 words. Closing date is 31st Jan, and the full details are on their website: http://www.thefictiondesk.com/submissions/flash-fiction-competition.php