Tag Archives: reviews

“I am a #writer” – Keeping the Faith

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One of the best Christmas presents I ever received was a portable typewriter. Granted, we’re going back a bit. I was 13. My mum had watched me scribbling away in notebooks, or head buried in a kazillion novels over the previous months/years. She had listened when I told her I wanted to be a writer. And she wanted to help. Opening my present on Christmas Day was one of those rites of passage moments – not only was it something I really wanted (I appreciate this makes me a pretty nerdy teenager!), but it was a proper grown-up present. And most importantly, it meant that my parents didn’t think I was being silly. I said I wanted to be a writer: they believed me, and believed in me.

I now know how lucky I was. And I also now know that having people around you who believe in you is only half the battle – you also have to believe in yourself. There are so many hundreds, thousands, of great books out there, so many talented writers, it’s easy to become discouraged, to think there’s no place for you. Even literary success may not wholly dispel feelings of “imposter syndrome”.

After some initial (perhaps too easily won) success in short story writing when I was a teenager, my writing “career” took a nose dive. For many, many years I dabbled, but didn’t work at it. Only when I made the decision to do a Creative Writing MA did I truly start to take myself and my writing seriously. There were huge benefits – from writing regularly, from being exposed to other people’s writing processing and discussing each other’s work, and from learning about the wider publishing industry. Building my author identify online (instead of hiding way in anonymity) was a huge step for me (I kept waiting for the sky to fall in – just for reference, it didn’t). Achieving the MA gave me some kind of validation – as did publication and success in writing competitions. But hearing feedback from readers is the best thing. (This is the first year I’ve had “fan mail”! Thank you so much to the people who have emailed or contacted me via Twitter to tell me they’ve enjoyed my stories – I can’t tell you how much I appreciate your support.)

I know several would-be writers who are too nervous to show their work to the wider world, or even talk about their writing. But if you write, you are a writer, and if you want the wider world to believe in you as a writer, you must first believe in yourself. If you want the wider world to know about your writing, you have to talk about what you do.

Next week is National Short Story Week – a great opportunity to talk about all things writing and short story related. To coincide with this, I’m running two special offers on my eBooks:

The Camel in the Garden will be FREE from Monday 13th – Friday 17th November 2017

Beyond Words will be HALF PRICE from Monday 13th – Sunday 19th November 2017, so you will be able to pick up 12 stories for a mere 99p.

To find out more about either of these short story collections, click the relevant tab at the top of this page.

If you’ve struggled with self-belief or “imposter syndrome” and would like to tell us about something which made the difference for you, please comment below. Similarly, if you read any great short stories over the coming week, please let us know. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

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“Reading” Audio Books

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As an avid fan of audio books – particularly to listen to whilst driving – I’m a regular at my local library, where, for a small fee, I can borrow from a wide range of titles available. Having someone reading to you while driving can help to make the heaviest of traffic stress-free. In fact, the only problem I usually have is arriving at my destination when the story has reached an especially gripping moment, and not wanting to get out of the car!

Of course, it’s always disappointing when a book doesn’t live up to its promise. I recently borrowed an audio book but only managed to listen to about 20 minutes worth before I found myself wanting to rip it out of the car stereo and hurl it though the window. I won’t mention the title, but to say the characters lacked depth would be an understatement, the scenario was pretty unlikely, and the author’s knowledge of the world her characters were inhabiting seemed sketchy to say the least. I felt a bit robbed (not of the library fee – I figure it all goes to a good cause if it’s ploughed back into the library service – and I hope this is the case), but by the way the book had been presented.

It’s not the first time I’ve been disappointed by an audio book, but I would say I’m far less often disappointed by a physical hard copy book. This got me thinking about the way in which we choose books to read. You may not be able to judge a book by its cover, but you can’t help but be influenced by cover design (after all, if you weren’t, publishers and indie authors wouldn’t spend so much time, money and effort in designing covers in the first place). You are likely to read the  “blurb”, and then, if it’s a hard copy book, you might read a few lines of the first page, just to see if you like the style and tone of the writing. With an audio book, you don’t get this last opportunity, which I think is where I come unstuck. Sometimes the blurb doesn’t seem to be a true reflection of the story at all, or neglects to mention some aspect of the book which, had you known in advance, would have warned you that this wasn’t the book for you.

The other element which can affect your enjoyment, or otherwise, of an audio book is the person it is being read by. The reader’s voice will have a huge impact on the tone of the story. A good reader can handle different character voices, deal with changes of pace within the narrative, make scene changes clear, etc. – and they will do all of this unobtrusively, so that the listener is not distracted from the story itself. I’m fairly sure that I’ve enjoyed some books more as audio books simply because of the excellent reading (as I know I sometimes read too fast and miss important details). On the other hand, if I’m not enjoying an audio book, I do sometimes find myself wondering how the same book might appear to me if I was reading it myself. As a reader, you cannot help but bring yourself, your past experiences, your preconceptions to the story – and this must influence your interpretation of the words written on the page. A few times while I’ve been listening to an audio book, the reader has read a piece of dialogue in a way I suspect I wouldn’t have interpreted in my own head had I been reading it to myself. While literary theorists might argue there isn’t a “right” interpretation, if it jars with you the listener, it can’t help but bring you out of the story and taint your enjoyment a little.

To help inform my choice while I’m at the library, I sometimes take a look at reviews online while I’m trying to decide, but even this is problematic.  Lots of books seem to end up scoring around the 3.8 mark on Goodreads (for example), and for every reviewer who loved it, there’s always another who seemed to absolutely loathe it. You have to read between the lines to work out which set of reviewers you are likely to side with!

So at the moment, I am without an audio book for the car, and therefore will soon be on the hunt for my next “fix”.  If you have any recommendations – either for individual titles, or for the best way to choose an audio book – please let me know!   🙂

 

 

Special Offer for Storytelling Week

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Who doesn’t love hearing a story told to them? Whether you’re a child listening with rapt attention to a bedtime story made up for you by your parents, or you’re an adult listening to an audio book in the car on the daily commute, there’s something magical about being told a story. As someone who reads quite quickly, and not always very carefully (in fact, sometimes I skim read – a terrible admission for a writer!), listening to a story sometimes helps me pick up nuances and details I’d otherwise have missed.

Well, this great oral tradition is celebrated during National Storytelling Week which this year runs from 28th January to 4th February. You can find out all about it here:

http://www.sfs.org.uk/national-storytelling-week

I’m afraid I don’t yet have any audio versions of my stories, though there are lots of other out there, such as Patsy Collins’ story “Uncle Mick” available to listen to here:

Not to be outdone though, in honour of all things short-story related, my collection The Camel in the Garden is free to download from Amazon Kindle this weekend.

If you take the opportunity to download it, you could always read it to someone else! And if you like the stories, and had time to leave a brief Amazon review, I’d be ever so grateful.

Thank you – and happy reading!

 

Christmas Gifts for Writers

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So it’s Christmas time again
Black Friday deals are rife
And you’re wondering what to buy
For the writer in your life

In the past you’ve tried all sorts
‘How-to’ books, diaries, pens,
Fancy paper, post-it notes
A writer’s mug (again!)

But the best gift is often simple
You might not even have to buy it
Arrange to give them space and time
To write in peace and quiet

Nag them when they’re lazy
Cheer them up when they’re dejected
Give them wine and cuddles
When their stories get rejected

And when their book is published
Spread the word of their debut,
Buy a copy for yourself
Leave an honest, fair review

Tell all your friends who care to hear
And then tell all the rest
And I guarantee your writer
Will think you are the best!

 

 

PS: Socks are also good! :0) xx

Dear Reader of eBooks

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Thank you, o’ dear reader

For clicking on my book

For scrolling through the others

And giving mine a second look

 

I hope you like the cover

(It was professionally designed!)

And the blurb sparks interest –

Makes you want to “Look inside”

 

When you read the first few pages

I hope you find you’re hooked

And that you click to download

To read the whole eBook

 

I hope the writing grabs you

And the stories entertain

The dialogue rings true

The plotline doesn’t wane

 

And if you find you loved it?

Tell all your friends – please do!

And then tell all the reading world –

Please, please, leave a review!

 ~ Jenny Roman

 

To download “Beyond Words”, or to leave a review, please visit:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Beyond-Words-short-stories-deception-ebook/dp/B01JWLPKW0/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Songs, Flags & Nag Rags!

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Friends and regular readers of this blog will know that it’s not uncommon for my online presence to turn into…well, an online absence…as I devote my time to all things equine rather than writing-related. Which makes it all the better when I can combine my two passions in life, and write about horses.

This morning, I picked up a copy of Horse & Rider magazine (which my husband affectionately referred to as the “nag rag”), which features the first article I’ve written for a long time – and it’s really exciting to see it in print (after having the original idea sometime over the Christmas holidays!).

It was a good discipline, trying my hand at non-fiction for a change – and certainly something I’d like to do more of in the future.

Also delighted to discover I’ve now had 11 reviews on my eBook The Camel in the Garden a big thank you to everyone who has taken the trouble to share their thoughts on the stories.  It’s really appreciated.

Having also finished edits on, and subbed, a new story this morning, I think I’ve had a productive writing-related day, and can feel justified this evening in watching a bit of telly – so Eurovision it is!