Tag Archives: short fiction

Why this might be my last short story

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You’d be forgiven for thinking I’d abandoned writing altogether, given the lack of recent blog posts. This isn’t the case, and apologies for the radio silence, but two linked events have prompted this post.

The first is the publication of my latest short story in the current issue of Woman’s Weekly. Now, I’ve written for WW for over five years, and during that time they’ve published some stuff I’m really proud of. Some may knock the woman’s magazine market, but I’ve always been of the opinion that WW has allowed writers a little more freedom in terms of subject matter and depth than some of the other magazines, particularly in their Fiction Specials, so I’ve always enjoyed writing for them.

This week though, there’s been outcry in the womag writing community after Time Inc, who now own WW, changed their contracts to bring their fiction acquisition in line with their other freelance material (non-fiction, photographs etc.). New contracts will be issued on an all-rights basis meaning that any fiction writer whose work appears in the magazine will have no further rights to their own story. In the past, after 18 months you could submit your story elsewhere or publish it yourself (as I’ve done with my collection The Camel in the Garden for instance). More importantly, the story still belonged to you in both the moral and legal sense.

 

“Symptoms” was accepted months ago under the old contract, hence my copyright is intact. In the past, I have sold a few stories on an all-rights basis (one of which was very early on when I was young and particularly dim. I didn’t even keep a copy of the story – and I never managed to get hold of a printed copy either, so that story is well and truly gone – all these years later, I can’t even remember the title or what it was about, save it was an equine-themed one). If you’re a writer starting out, and it’s your first sale, then I guess you might be so happy to see your work in print you might not mind about the rights issue. But for me, I’m afraid I won’t be making any future submissions to Woman’s Weekly as at stands, which makes me feel rather sad. We can but hope there will be a change of heart at Time Inc head office, but I very doubt it.

If you want to read more about the situation, Simon Whaley has written a comprehensive article on his blog here and there’s plenty of discussion about the issue on social media at the moment. If you have anything to add, please feel free to comment below.

 

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Online Story Outlets – Fictive Dream

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In the words of Bob Dylan, the times they are a changin’, and whilst there may be fewer print outlets for short stories writers than there were in the past, on the web there’s a proliferation of ezines, blogs and pages devoted to flash and short fiction. At the moment, publication via these outlets generally won’t earn you any hard cash – and it’s up to the individual writer to consider whether or not they are happy for their work to appear for free. An established writer may not see much benefit, but if you’re new to writing and hoping to build a list of writing credits, or simply want the buzz of seeing your work “out there”, it’s a step on the literary ladder.

There’s also a case if, like me, you’re hoping to make links, and promote your other work. Having a story on a website devoted to the medium may bring you to the attention of a few more readers who otherwise wouldn’t have heard of you. If they like your free story, perhaps they’ll click the link to your Amazon author page, or start following your blog.

“Fictive Dream” which was launched six months ago, is one such online magazine dedicated to the short story, and is open to submissions from both emerging and established writers. Editor Laura Black is looking for “stories with a contemporary feel that give an insight into the human condition…  They may be on any subject. They may be challenging, dramatic, playful, exhilarating or cryptic. Above all, they must be well-crafted and compelling.”

In a recent email to her writers, Laura writes, “From the start, it became clear that the calibre of the Fictive Dream writer was going to be high. Almost all of you are experienced authors, many with short story collections, novels or plays already behind you. However, it’s also great to be including talented new writers in the early stages of their writing careers. “

Today sees the publication of my story Raspberry Ripple – I’m excited to see this story appear on “Fictive Dream” and hope readers enjoy it. Of course, I also hope that they’d like to read more of my work, and decide to visit this blog, or download one of my ebooks, but anything which encourages interest and enthusiasm in the short story gets a thumbs up from me.

To read Raspberry Ripple, or find out more about “Fictive Dream”, including their submission guidelines, visit https://fictivedream.com/

Happy Reading!

 

 

 

Seasonal Storytelling

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The Autumn issue of Park Publications’ Scribble magazine is out now – encompassing a wide range of genres, styles and themes. Editor David Howarth is keen to publish stories on any subject as long as there’s an intriguing plot and believable, engaging characters so this is a good market for slightly more quirky stories that might be not be suitable for the mainstream magazines. Payment is in vouchers which can be used towards future entry fees or an annual subscription, but the three best stories (as voted for by the subscribers) receive a cash prize. Far more important though is the opportunity to receive feedback from real readers via the letters page which is always extensive.

My plug for this great little magazine is not wholly altruistic, I have to admit – this issue contains one of my stories ‘Penny For the Guy’ – a rather tongue in cheek autumnal tale!

To find out more about writing for Scribble or to subscribe, visit http://www.parkpublications.co.uk

Oh, and if you do subscribe – don’t forget to vote! Your feedback is invaluable.

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